Now Dawkins Thinks Children’s Stories are Harmful

Further evidence that Richard Dawkins is a crackpot:

“Is it a good thing to go along with the fantasies of childhood, magical as they are? Or should we be fostering a spirit of scepticism?” the Daily Telegraph quotes him as saying.

“I think it’s rather pernicious to inculcate into a child a view of the world which includes supernaturalism – we get enough of that anyway.

“Even fairy tales, the ones we all love, with wizards or princesses turning into frogs or whatever it was. There’s a very interesting reason why a prince could not turn into a frog – it’s statistically too improbable.”

It looks like people have been laughing at him:

After facing somewhat of a backlash over claims that Professor Dawkins had implyed the stories themselves were harmful, he clarified his remarks on Twitter, saying that his initial raising of the question had been taken out of contest.

Of course. It’s always the fault of someone other than Dawkins.

“It IS pernicious to inculcate supernaturalism into a child,” he posted on the social networking site. “But DO fairytales do that? It’s an interesting Q. The answer is probably no.”

First of all, there is no evidence it “IS pernicious to inculcate supernaturalism into a child.” That’s just Dawkins making things up again.

Second, it sure looks to me like he was indeed pointing fingers at fairytales: “I think it’s rather pernicious to inculcate into a child a view of the world which includes supernaturalism – we get enough of that anyway.”

“Even fairy tales, the ones we all love, with wizards or princesses turning into frogs or whatever it was. There’s a very interesting reason why a prince could not turn into a frog – it’s statistically too improbable.”

Advertisements
This entry was posted in atheism, New Atheism, Richard Dawkins and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Now Dawkins Thinks Children’s Stories are Harmful

  1. Nolan says:

    Dawkins likes some fairy tales…. the fairy tale that mystically and magically matter became endowed with conscious wherewithal.
    The ability of a certain class of matter to be able to peer into the workings of the universe.

    Amazing.

  2. Ilíon says:

    There’s a very interesting reason why a prince could not turn into a frog – it’s statistically too improbable.

    The poor, old, senile fuddy can’t even reason properly. What he’s asserting is that events with low statistical probability are logically impossible because of the low statistical probability.

  3. Shizzle says:

    “There’s a very interesting reason why a prince could not turn
    into a frog – it’s statistically too improbable.”

    Somebody should’ve reminded him that according to evodelusion (the basis of his religion), a frog can turn into a prince, given time. He’s gone mad.

  4. TFBW says:

    If you believe it can happen instantly, it’s a fairy tale. If you believe it can happen over millions of years (and generations), it’s the Fact of Evolution. After all, if frogs evolved into humans, then presumably it would be possible for human beings to evolve back into frogs, given the right fitness terrain.

    It’s interesting that he objects on the basis of it being “statistically too improbable”, rather than “a violation of the law of conservation of mass/energy”. Then again, once you’ve embraced the idea of “a universe from nothing”, there really isn’t a “law” of conservation of mass/energy — just a high probability of it. But I wonder which is the more improbable: that a prince could spontaneously become a frog, or that nothing could spontaneously become the universe? I’d like to see his calculations. 🙂

  5. Ilíon says:

    If you believe it can happen instantly, it’s a fairy tale …

    Except when it’s ‘Science!‘, as discussed/mocked here — iliocentrism.blogspot.com/2010/07/science-and-miracles-and-skepticism.html (I’m apologize for not giving a clickable link, but WordPress sends posts linking to Blogspot into the bit-bucket)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s