Cracks in Gnutopia?

On a recent Sunday, my family and I only showed up 10 minutes early for Mass. That meant we had to sit in fold-out chairs in the spillover room, where the Mass is relayed on a large TV screen. During the service, my toddler had to go to the bathroom. To get there, we had to step over a dozen people sitting in hallways and corners. This is business as usual for my church in Paris, France.

I point this out because one of the most familiar tropes in social commentary today is the loss of Christian faith in Europe in general, and France in particular. The Wall Street Journal recently fretted about the sale of “Europe’s empty churches.”

Could it be, instead, that France is in the early stages of a Christian revival?

Yes, churches in the French countryside are desperately empty. There are no young people there. But then, there are no young people in the French countryside, period. France is a modern country with an advanced economy, and that means its countryside has emptied, and that means that churches built in an era when the country’s sociological makeup was quite different go empty. In the cities — which is where people are, and where cultural trends gain escape velocity — the story is quite different.

Is there a Christian revival starting in France?

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3 Responses to Cracks in Gnutopia?

  1. Nolan says:

    Mass? You Catholic, Mike?
    Or Eastern Orthodox?

  2. Michael says:

    Nope

  3. James says:

    Nolan,
    The content of this post on the blog is the content of the article in The Week that Mike links to at the end (i.e., it’s not Mike).

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