Hey Max Boot, Here’s Why I Would Be Unlikely to Vote for an Unapologetic Atheist

Atheist Max Boot wrote an article for the Washington Post complaining that people won’t vote for an atheist for President.

Boot offers up the typical, self-serving argument about how atheists are victims:

Atheists are looked down upon because of the erroneous assumption that you can’t be good without God.

Oh, please.  The reason I would be unlikely to vote for an “unapologetic atheist” is because unapologetic atheists tend to have contempt for religious people, sneering at them as people who are delusional, stupid, mindless sheep.  Unapologetic atheists tend to be anti-religious.  Why would I vote for someone who sneers at me for being delusional and stupid?  Why would I vote for someone who thinks he/she is so much more superior to me?

Recall that unapologetic atheist Richard Dawkins publicly called upon his atheist followers to go out and mock religious believers.  Dawkins himself routinely mocked religious people as “faith heads.”

Recall  that unapologetic atheist Peter Boghossian insisted the government needed to classify religious faith as a mental disorder.  Dawkins likened religion to small pox.

Recall that unapologetic atheist Sam Harris referred to Christians as people with psychopathic and psychotic moral attitudes.

Recall that unapologetic atheist Jerry Coyne insisted it should be illegal to give your children a religious upbringing.

And keep in mind that when such unapologetic atheists made these hateful claims, the community of unapologetic atheists cheered them on.

And then we have all the atheist organizations who seem to spend all their time trying to cleanse the public arena of all religious symbols and speech.

Ironically, Boot makes this point:

Most of China’s 1.4 billion people have no religious affiliation, and fewer than 7 percent are monotheists. Is there any reason to believe that China is a less moral place than the United States, where 70.6 percent profess to be Christians?

Seriously?  How about we start by comparing free speech rights in atheist China vs. the United States?  Anyone?  Y’see, I consider free speech a moral issue.

Or that Europeans act worse than Americans because only 27 percent of them believe in the God described in the Bible, compared with 56 percent of Americans?

Or, we start by comparing free speech rights in Europe vs. the United States?

Let’s face it.  Unapologetic atheists only defend free speech when it comes to their right to hate on religion.  Unapologetic atheists tend to be hostile to religious speech.

So why would I vote for someone who thinks I am stupid and thinks I should keep my mouth shut?

Yes, atheists, you do have a public image problem.  And while it may make you feel good about yourselves to believe it’s all about being misperceived as someone who can’t be good, that’s not it.  The problem is you are perceived as haters – people who sneer at religion and look down on religious people.  Look at it this way.  In the USA, the modern public image of atheism was shaped by Madalyn Murray O’Hair.  And over the next 50 years, the atheist community has been more likely to follow in her footsteps than go the other way.

And you are perplexed people won’t vote for you?

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12 Responses to Hey Max Boot, Here’s Why I Would Be Unlikely to Vote for an Unapologetic Atheist

  1. Kevin says:

    Unapologetic atheists only defend free speech when it comes to their right to hate on religion.

    These days this type of atheist is being overshadowed by the social justice atheists who believe it is racist and Islamophobic to criticize Islam or a Muslim, but it is perfectly acceptable to trash Christianity.

  2. nsr says:

    I know SJWs rarely do logic, but I still cannot get my head around their refusal to criticise Islam for all of the things they apparently criticise Christianity for: exclusivity, patriarchy, being anti-LGBT, misogyny, etc.

  3. TFBW says:

    Double standards are the only standards they have. Logic and reason are tools of Patriarchal Oppression, after all.

  4. apollyon911 says:

    The Devil doesn’t care about Islam…

  5. jim- says:

    I’m not willing to trade my integrity for hope. Pretty simple. I don’t believe. What am I supposed to do, pretend?

  6. Dhay says:

    > The problem is you are perceived as haters – people who sneer at religion and look down on religious people.

    jim- > … trade my integrity for hope. … pretend?

    I’m sure you are sincere, but that’s the problem.

    > And you are perplexed people won’t vote for you?

  7. Kevin Reed says:

    Jim,

    I might vote for someone who doesn’t believe something I do, but I would not vote for someone who said he would have to trade his integrity to believe what I do. That’s a bit of an insult.

    You could always speak out against atheists who sneer at Christian’s. That would at least make you a political ally.

  8. Isaac says:

    “I’m not willing to trade my integrity for hope. Pretty simple.”

    Neither am I. Funny how that works. Atheism provides hope and solace for millions of people who wish to order their lives a certain way, without fear of being judged based on an objective morality proscribed by an author of objective Truth. That hope is based on an illogical and unlikely premise, in my studied opinion. You don’t have to agree, but your attempt to frame yourself as both having integrity and rejecting false hope by being atheist could just as easily be turned the other way.

  9. pennywit says:

    A few disorganized thoughts:

    1) I wonder how many people aren’t personally religious, but attend religious services because they fear social consequences or that people will judge them if they don’t.
    1a) I wonder how many people attend church for reasons other than belief (fellowship, performing acts of service, listening to the music, etc.) but choose not to share their nonbelief with others.
    1b) I wonder how many of these people are politicians.
    1c) I wonder how many people would publicly admit/confess atheism if they thought there would be less social consequence for doing so.
    1d) I wonder whether the growth of “nones” is an increase in actual atheists/agnostics/whatever, or an increase in people who are willing to admit it.

    2) How many people would vote for somebody who is atheist, but hides it behind an outwardly religious veneer, vs. an atheist who is honest about his beliefs? And why would somebody prefer the former over a latter?
    2a) What about somebody who outwardly professes atheism, but otherwise lives his life in accordance with, say, Christian religious teachings?

    3) The United States’ current religious/political moment frightens me a little bit. This is floating around out there. I can’t tell if Trump’s campaign aides sincerely believe he’s chosen by God (or somesuch), or if they’re cynically peddling it in an attempt to get American Christians to vote for the man in 2020. I don’t consider either possibility a good thing.
    3a) I don’t like the notion that ANY American president is divinely ordained to do anything. IMNSHO, the US President is temporary steward of the country, not somebody who reigns by the divine right of kings.

    4) I don’t think atheists should run around insulting people’s faith. But why should an atheist apologize for being an atheist?

  10. pennywit says:

    4a) And why should an atheist apologize for other atheists’ misdeeds? That’s like demanding that an American Lutheran minister apologize for the Spanish Inquisition.

  11. Kevin says:

    Big difference between apologizing for others’ behavior and condemning it.

  12. pennywit says:

    As a side note, I did try to do that in atheist fora for a while. Eventually, I stopped participating in those fora because I found them noxious and I had better things to do with my time.

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