Public Health Scientists Losing Credibility

From the NYT:

As the pandemic took hold, most epidemiologists have had clear proscriptions in fighting it: No students in classrooms, no in-person religious services, no visits to sick relatives in hospitals, no large public gatherings.

So when conservative anti-lockdown protesters gathered on state capitol steps in places like Columbus, Ohio, and Lansing, Mich., in April and May, epidemiologists scolded them and forecast surging infections. When Gov. Brian Kemp of Georgia relaxed restrictions on businesses in late April as testing lagged and infections rose, the talk in public health circles was of that state’s embrace of human sacrifice.

And then the brutal killing of George Floyd by the police in Minneapolis on May 25 changed everything.

Soon the streets nationwide were full of tens of thousands of people in a mass protest movement that continues to this day, with demonstrations and the toppling of statues. And rather than decrying mass gatherings, more than 1,300 public health officials signed a May 30 letter of support, and many joined the protests.

That reaction, and the contrast with the epidemiologists’ earlier fervent support for the lockdown, gave rise to an uncomfortable question: Was public health advice in a pandemic dependent on whether people approved of the mass gathering in question? To many, the answer seemed to be “yes.”

Duh. It “seemed” to be yes because it is yes.

Now watch as some of the “public health scientists” demonstrate their unreliability:

Some public health scientists publicly waved off the conflicted feelings of their colleagues, saying the country now confronts a stark moral choice. The letter signed by more than 1,300 epidemiologists and health workers urged Americans to adopt a “consciously anti-racist” stance and framed the difference between the anti-lockdown demonstrators and the protesters in moral, ideological and racial terms.

Those who protested stay-at-home orders were “rooted in white nationalism and run contrary to respect for Black lives,” the letter stated.

By contrast, it said, those protesting systemic racism “must be supported.”

“As public health advocates,” they stated, “we do not condemn these gatherings as risky for Covid-19 transmission. We support them as vital to the national public health.”

I would not trust the scientific conclusions of any epidemiolgist who signed this statement.  For it shows they are not guided by scientific thinking; they are guided by ideology.

 

 

This entry was posted in activism, Science and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

9 Responses to Public Health Scientists Losing Credibility

  1. Ilíon says:

    It’s almost like it never ceases to amaze those who think to play other people that *most* people can see when they are being played, and so the success of the play largely depends on the willingness (or desire) of the targeted marks to be played.

  2. Another terrifying example of how the preservation of human life has to take a back seat to ideology. I guess when people stop believing in God they have to replace him with something else.

  3. apollyon911 says:

    You can fool all the people some of the time, and some of the people all the time, but you cannot fool all the people all the time.

  4. pennywit says:

    I talked to a couple public-health professionals I know, and they grappled with the question. The consensus, apparently, is that public-health professionals also viewed police brutality against Blacks as a danger to public health.

    Personally, I think that public-health advisors should have stuck to an apolitical assessment.

  5. TFBW says:

    The consensus, apparently, is that public-health professionals also viewed police brutality against Blacks as a danger to public health.

    I guess when you’re a public health professional, everything looks like a public health problem. So what was their professional opinion on how to tackle this problem? Go out and protest in large crowds during a supposed pandemic? Is this what is best for public health? I’ve never heard of that being classified as public health advice before, and it stands in stark contrast to their opposition to protesting other things, like lockdown. It’s almost like they consider adherence to their political views a matter of public health.

  6. Ilíon says:

    TFBW:… It’s almost like they consider adherence to their political views a matter of public health.

    Well, they did declare that “systemic racism” — which, if it even is a thing, is entirely an artifact of leftist/progressive control of local governments — to be a priority “public health issue”.

    … So what was their professional opinion on how to tackle this problem? Go out and protest in large crowds during a supposed pandemic? Is this what is best for public health? …

    Oh, now! Simply everyone knows that to make an omelette, you have to break a few eggs.

  7. TFBW says:

    Just because you’re breaking eggs doesn’t mean you’re making an omelette.

  8. Ilíon says:

    Comrade, we have been breaking eggs and making the omelette since 1789! And when the omelette arrives, you will praise its perfection (lest you become an egg)!

  9. Isaac says:

    It was a simple cost-benefit analysis, such as we all make, for the most part.

    The benefit of being consistent and honest scientifically was not worth the cost of being accused of racism or not being seen as sufficiently down for the cause.

    Part of following Jesus, for me, has been learning to swallow the cost of being truthful and consistent. The Bible and the Holy Spirit keep reminding me to value objective truth above the respect of man.

    One catchphrase that the postmodern Left keeps repeating is “read the room.” I reflexively find that wording repulsive. “Reading the room” is what I did before becoming a Christian. “Reading the room” is how I learned to go along with whatever the crowd was doing in high school, whether it was making fun of the kids in the Special Needs class or ignoring it when someone was being bullied. “Reading the room” is for gutless cowards.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.